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So You Want to Write a Cookbook? Part V: Writing, Testing and Photographing Recipes

So You Want to Write a Cookbook? Part V: Writing, Testing and Photographing Recipes


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By Jenny McCoy, Chef Instructor, School of Pastry & Baking Arts

Alright readers…here we are. Part five. The last post in my, “So You Want to Write a Cookbook,” series. We’re almost at the end of this exciting, grueling, rewarding process—I hope you’ve managed to stay tuned!

As I write this post, I'm in the midst of my latest cookbook project. I recently signed a cookbook deal with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, which means I’m knee-deep in developing a fresh batch of recipes—so what better time to coach you through that very process?

Creating Your Recipe Roadmap
As a first step, I drafted a working list of the recipe ideas I’d like to feature in my cookbook. My new book is contracted to have six chapters and 80 to 100 recipes in total. If you do the math, that’s about 13 to 16 recipes per chapter. So I started by creating a list of 15 ideas per chapter.

Why the extra work? Once I begin to test these recipes, I know that some will be tossed, others will morph into entirely different ideas, and a few will remain exactly the same. My list will constantly evolve—and even more recipes ideas will pop into my head during the testing process—but I've found that having a game plan at the outset is the best way to start.


Ten Things I Wish I’d Known About Chef

This one caused me quite a lot of grief. I needed to override the IP address that ohai (the tool that gathers information about each Chef node and places in the node object) gets from the node. It takes the default route’s interface’s IP address by default, but this caused me lots of grief when using Vagrant. force_override ​ (see 8) above) doesn’t work because it’s an automatic ohai variable. I am not the only one with this problem, but I never found a ‘correct’ solution. In the end I used this hack. Find the ruby file that sets the ip and mac address. Depending on the version this may differ for you: Then get the ip address and mac address of the interface you want to use (in this case the eth1 interface: Finally, use sed (or gsed if you are on a mac) to hard-code the ruby file that gets the details to return the information you want: If you enjoyed this, then please consider buying me a coffee to encourage me to do more.

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Ten Things I Wish I’d Known About Chef

This one caused me quite a lot of grief. I needed to override the IP address that ohai (the tool that gathers information about each Chef node and places in the node object) gets from the node. It takes the default route’s interface’s IP address by default, but this caused me lots of grief when using Vagrant. force_override ​ (see 8) above) doesn’t work because it’s an automatic ohai variable. I am not the only one with this problem, but I never found a ‘correct’ solution. In the end I used this hack. Find the ruby file that sets the ip and mac address. Depending on the version this may differ for you: Then get the ip address and mac address of the interface you want to use (in this case the eth1 interface: Finally, use sed (or gsed if you are on a mac) to hard-code the ruby file that gets the details to return the information you want: If you enjoyed this, then please consider buying me a coffee to encourage me to do more.

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Ten Things I Wish I’d Known About Chef

This one caused me quite a lot of grief. I needed to override the IP address that ohai (the tool that gathers information about each Chef node and places in the node object) gets from the node. It takes the default route’s interface’s IP address by default, but this caused me lots of grief when using Vagrant. force_override ​ (see 8) above) doesn’t work because it’s an automatic ohai variable. I am not the only one with this problem, but I never found a ‘correct’ solution. In the end I used this hack. Find the ruby file that sets the ip and mac address. Depending on the version this may differ for you: Then get the ip address and mac address of the interface you want to use (in this case the eth1 interface: Finally, use sed (or gsed if you are on a mac) to hard-code the ruby file that gets the details to return the information you want: If you enjoyed this, then please consider buying me a coffee to encourage me to do more.

Share this:

Like this:

Related


Ten Things I Wish I’d Known About Chef

This one caused me quite a lot of grief. I needed to override the IP address that ohai (the tool that gathers information about each Chef node and places in the node object) gets from the node. It takes the default route’s interface’s IP address by default, but this caused me lots of grief when using Vagrant. force_override ​ (see 8) above) doesn’t work because it’s an automatic ohai variable. I am not the only one with this problem, but I never found a ‘correct’ solution. In the end I used this hack. Find the ruby file that sets the ip and mac address. Depending on the version this may differ for you: Then get the ip address and mac address of the interface you want to use (in this case the eth1 interface: Finally, use sed (or gsed if you are on a mac) to hard-code the ruby file that gets the details to return the information you want: If you enjoyed this, then please consider buying me a coffee to encourage me to do more.

Share this:

Like this:

Related


Ten Things I Wish I’d Known About Chef

This one caused me quite a lot of grief. I needed to override the IP address that ohai (the tool that gathers information about each Chef node and places in the node object) gets from the node. It takes the default route’s interface’s IP address by default, but this caused me lots of grief when using Vagrant. force_override ​ (see 8) above) doesn’t work because it’s an automatic ohai variable. I am not the only one with this problem, but I never found a ‘correct’ solution. In the end I used this hack. Find the ruby file that sets the ip and mac address. Depending on the version this may differ for you: Then get the ip address and mac address of the interface you want to use (in this case the eth1 interface: Finally, use sed (or gsed if you are on a mac) to hard-code the ruby file that gets the details to return the information you want: If you enjoyed this, then please consider buying me a coffee to encourage me to do more.

Share this:

Like this:

Related


Ten Things I Wish I’d Known About Chef

This one caused me quite a lot of grief. I needed to override the IP address that ohai (the tool that gathers information about each Chef node and places in the node object) gets from the node. It takes the default route’s interface’s IP address by default, but this caused me lots of grief when using Vagrant. force_override ​ (see 8) above) doesn’t work because it’s an automatic ohai variable. I am not the only one with this problem, but I never found a ‘correct’ solution. In the end I used this hack. Find the ruby file that sets the ip and mac address. Depending on the version this may differ for you: Then get the ip address and mac address of the interface you want to use (in this case the eth1 interface: Finally, use sed (or gsed if you are on a mac) to hard-code the ruby file that gets the details to return the information you want: If you enjoyed this, then please consider buying me a coffee to encourage me to do more.

Share this:

Like this:

Related


Ten Things I Wish I’d Known About Chef

This one caused me quite a lot of grief. I needed to override the IP address that ohai (the tool that gathers information about each Chef node and places in the node object) gets from the node. It takes the default route’s interface’s IP address by default, but this caused me lots of grief when using Vagrant. force_override ​ (see 8) above) doesn’t work because it’s an automatic ohai variable. I am not the only one with this problem, but I never found a ‘correct’ solution. In the end I used this hack. Find the ruby file that sets the ip and mac address. Depending on the version this may differ for you: Then get the ip address and mac address of the interface you want to use (in this case the eth1 interface: Finally, use sed (or gsed if you are on a mac) to hard-code the ruby file that gets the details to return the information you want: If you enjoyed this, then please consider buying me a coffee to encourage me to do more.

Share this:

Like this:

Related


Ten Things I Wish I’d Known About Chef

This one caused me quite a lot of grief. I needed to override the IP address that ohai (the tool that gathers information about each Chef node and places in the node object) gets from the node. It takes the default route’s interface’s IP address by default, but this caused me lots of grief when using Vagrant. force_override ​ (see 8) above) doesn’t work because it’s an automatic ohai variable. I am not the only one with this problem, but I never found a ‘correct’ solution. In the end I used this hack. Find the ruby file that sets the ip and mac address. Depending on the version this may differ for you: Then get the ip address and mac address of the interface you want to use (in this case the eth1 interface: Finally, use sed (or gsed if you are on a mac) to hard-code the ruby file that gets the details to return the information you want: If you enjoyed this, then please consider buying me a coffee to encourage me to do more.

Share this:

Like this:

Related


Ten Things I Wish I’d Known About Chef

This one caused me quite a lot of grief. I needed to override the IP address that ohai (the tool that gathers information about each Chef node and places in the node object) gets from the node. It takes the default route’s interface’s IP address by default, but this caused me lots of grief when using Vagrant. force_override ​ (see 8) above) doesn’t work because it’s an automatic ohai variable. I am not the only one with this problem, but I never found a ‘correct’ solution. In the end I used this hack. Find the ruby file that sets the ip and mac address. Depending on the version this may differ for you: Then get the ip address and mac address of the interface you want to use (in this case the eth1 interface: Finally, use sed (or gsed if you are on a mac) to hard-code the ruby file that gets the details to return the information you want: If you enjoyed this, then please consider buying me a coffee to encourage me to do more.

Share this:

Like this:

Related


Ten Things I Wish I’d Known About Chef

This one caused me quite a lot of grief. I needed to override the IP address that ohai (the tool that gathers information about each Chef node and places in the node object) gets from the node. It takes the default route’s interface’s IP address by default, but this caused me lots of grief when using Vagrant. force_override ​ (see 8) above) doesn’t work because it’s an automatic ohai variable. I am not the only one with this problem, but I never found a ‘correct’ solution. In the end I used this hack. Find the ruby file that sets the ip and mac address. Depending on the version this may differ for you: Then get the ip address and mac address of the interface you want to use (in this case the eth1 interface: Finally, use sed (or gsed if you are on a mac) to hard-code the ruby file that gets the details to return the information you want: If you enjoyed this, then please consider buying me a coffee to encourage me to do more.

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Comments:

  1. Nasho

    Matchless)))))))

  2. Kajir

    You are wrong. I can prove it. Email me at PM, we'll talk.

  3. Mikaktilar

    Not unyvay! Fun!

  4. Khoury

    Happiness is a ball that we chase as it rolls and that we kick with our foot when it stops. - NS.



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